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they've imposed this really a unpresdenned security environment in the boston area this morning. >> is it a new threat that they're trying to figure out? is that -- a new threat come in in the last few hours and that's what explains it or just finding this third relative or potentially? >> yeah, i'm not sure that i'd call them a threat. just a concern that they may have had accomplices and whether those accomplices have made threats, i don't know. but i believe that's the -- i believe that's part of the answer why they're concerned here. although i have to point out, we heard conflicting information about this. but several people who are in a position to know and are good sources say that that is the concern. now, as for the two brothers. i think you've discussed this some. the family came to the u.s., we're told, in 2002 or 2003 and claimed asylum. the father had been some kind of public official in either chechnya or kyrgyzstan. either a prosecutor or a police officer. so, the brothers have been here for a decade. one was born in russia. one is born in kyrgyzstan. and, so, the
yan. tla there's been tough military action. you flee that environment. you come into the united states. you go to school. you get a scholarship. you have friends. but somewhere in that leadened, deadened heart, head of yours, it's still not good enough. there is a cause that's more important, not survival, and i'm not sure we'll ever be able to comprehend that. we need to try because it may give us potential to identify other people. here we have a rather remarkable journey these two young men took. a journey literally millions have taken. and they've contributed to the united states. their contribution was death and destruction. of innocent people. we may never understand, rationalize, how. >> as you reference the uncle who pleaded with his nephew, dzhokhar, give yourself up, give yourself up. and of course that is the fervent wish of law enforcement officials for a number of reasons. one is for the survival of dzhokhar tsarnaev because there is a manhunt for him and he will not escape that network of law enforcement at some point. this will not come to a good end. but also fro
environment and have been a part since iceland was -- [inaudible] >> taking step back and looking for a broadly two things i've been talking about climate change and fishing. has global environmental change been benefit to iceland's fishery or a detriment? >> well, it's very difficult to an that question, indeed it's one of the big issues -- a number of decades because it has tradition nayly been the key part of the export driven fishing circle. of course the species as well. some people are arguing cue to the -- [inaudible] so one of the reasons why there is a need for more active arctic corporation is in fact to study what is happen together fishery in the ocean of the world including the arctic and the ice melt. and i found it interesting when i invited them to iceland a few years ago, he is, as you might know, a special envoy of the president of france on arctic and polar issues. his argument was that the first dispute that would unearth nationings to a new situation in the arctic would be dispute over fisheries. that the meting of the arctic sea ice and the transmore fashion
easy. it is challenging in this fiscal environment. administrations 39 budget -- $39 million budget request. consistent with what congress appropriated in 2013 for the department before sequestration cuts were applied. the level of funding in this budget is lower than what congress appropriated in 2009. stepping back and thinking of the challenges that our country and this department has faced since 2009, times square bombing, hurricane sandy, the ever-changing and growing cyber threat, and of the boston attack, it is easy to become concerned with this budget request. we are facing extremely difficult budgetary times. sacrifices must be made. they may not receive all of the funding. and agencies in government must share in the sacrifice to some extent required during this deficit. our secretary seems to have taken this message to heart. he is identified $1.3 billion in savings this year and more than $4 billion since 2009. he continues to move from a risk-based approach and it effort to save more money. i'm happy to see this budget proposes a much-needed increase for cybersecurity,
't create a fail safe environment. >> reporter: investigators have swept up a large amount of potential evidence including small bomb fragments and surveillance pictures and tape but we have to say it's too early to know if this attack was a work of a terror group, domestic or foreign, or the act of a lone wolf who was inspired to act out. charlie? >> bob orr, thanks. cities around the country increased security. with us now is rudy giuliani mayor of new york city during the 9/11 attacks who consults with other cities on handling terror attacks and also john miller, nypd commissioner during mr. giuliani's tenure. a this turns the clock back to 2001. whatever the thinking was on september 12th is now the thinking today. >> it really reminds us right, of what we knew on september 11th and september 12th that the big news here is this is a horrible attack terrible attack, my heart goes out to the people that were hurt but surprising there haven't been more of these since september 11th. we expected many attacks like this. the raleally remarkable story is so many ha
on destroying lives of innocent people. the best way in a school environment, in my view, is to confront that shooter with a traeupbt law enforcement -- trained law enforcement officer. the grassley amendment has money put back into the system that is president obama cut $300 million out of school safety at a time when i think that was very unwise. we restore that money. two months ago, maybe longer, there was a young woman at home in the atlanta suburbs with her two twin daughters. i believe they are twin daughters. there was a home invasion by someone who had just been released from jail. she took her children up into the closet on the second floor and hid in the closet, got on the cell phone call with her husband asking what to do. she grabbed the .38 revolver. the guy broke into the closet. she fired six times, hit him with the begun, hit him five of the six times and he was still able to drive away. in the hands of that mother, six shots were not enough. it wouldn't bother me one bit if she had 30 rounds. in the hands of a mentally unstable person or convicted felon, one bullet is o
to celebrate that in a family environment in a fun way. other people look at us differently. they look at patriotism as their enemy. they look at inon sense americans as targets. we are in a war here and we've got to deal with it accordingly. >> mayor, if you had to pinpoint some of issues, you bring up some of the difficulties in some of the ways that americans have to grapple with the idea of losing freedom, but also the idea of making sure that you feel secure in any of these areas. we talked to an analyst this morning who pointed out that the largest population of north secaucus former residents have to be in watertown, massachusetts, this is where this is all taking out and you live in a town that's a melting pot and has been for a long time. does that make it more difficult? >> boston area diversity has always been its strength, a large, young, student population, many from foreign countries have been our strength over the past years, over the past many years, but today we are vulnerable from international terrorist organizations that come into our city, come into our area and we
down and hone in on any place and anybody in this environment, this young man primarily and any family members who may know where he is. i'm looking at couple shots we're getting here. back in watertown, you have ongoing presence of the police there as well. they're trying to focus in where he may have gone, if he remains in watertown. if he was able to slip perhaps out of that cordon and if indeed he is still on the run, bill. bill: yeah. martha, just one thing to add from boston on that. we're hearing that logan airport has been closed. we can't confirm it but we're being working to that. some folks are saying trying to book to flights in washington and those flights are being diverted. "the boston globe" is saying the m.i.t. police officer that was killed in a confrontation with these terror suspects was sean collier, age 26, out of summerville, massachusetts. per the district attorney in middlesex county. it is possible that sean come letter, age 26, will indeed be the hero of this story and sitting in his car and gunned down in his car we don't know what he saw. it is possible he
of the techniques used against detainees in u.s. custody in a post-9/11 environment, the state department has characterized the same treatment as torture, abuse or cruel treatment when those techniques were applied by foreign governments. the cia recognized this in an internal review and acknowledged that many of the interrogation techniques it employed were inconsistent with the public policy positions the united states has taken regarding human rights. the united states is understandably subject to criticism when it criticizes another nation for engaging in torture and then justifies the same conduct under national security arguments. there are those that defend the techniques like waterboarding, stress positions and sleep deprivation because there was the office of legal counsel which issued a decision approving of their use because they defined them as not being torture. those opinions have since been repudiated by legal experts and the olc itself. and even in its opinion it relied not only on a very narrow legal definition of torture, but also on factual representations about how the tec
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

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